How to use up leftover paint

You may have recently completed the redecoration of a room in your home, or you may have some leftover paint lurking in your garage or shed. Whatever the situation, don’t be tempted to throw the paint away — you may feel like you have no further use for it, but once you have read through our ideas below you won’t believe you were ever going to chuck it out!

Continue reading How to use up leftover paint

How to upcycle car tyres

Due to its resilient nature, rubber is the perfect material for upcycling projects, and vehicle tyres can therefore be easily reused once they have become unroadworthy. Repurposing vehicle tyres is a nice alternative to sending them to landfill – an unfortunate ending for many tyres worldwide. When tyres are recycled, they are often shredded and used for producing playground surfaces, road embankments and synthetic turf. Why not reuse them before that stage and lengthen their life even more? Give some of these upcycling ideas a go.

Continue reading How to upcycle car tyres

8 surprising uses for fruit and vegetable peelings

Stop! Don’t throw those precious fruit and vegetable peelings in the bin. There’s always a further use for something, as you’ll see in our list of suggestions below. Let’s cut our food waste whilst enjoying new uses for our kitchen scraps. Peelings often contain more nutrients than the part we eat, so why not harness that goodness – whether that be on our skin, our hair, or elsewhere? And using the whole fruit or vegetable is much more environmentally friendly than binning it. Give these ideas a go:

1.      Get rid of ants with cucumber peel

Ants don’t like cucumber peel, and will avoid it at all costs, so if you have an ant problem in your house, place generous strips of cucumber peel along their entry point. No toxic and expensive chemicals needed! The more bitter the cucumber, the better the result.

2.      Clean your shower doors with lemon pulp

Photo: Photography Firm
Photo copyright: Photography Firm

Continue reading 8 surprising uses for fruit and vegetable peelings

Paper: how to reuse it

With so much talk of the negative impacts of plastic on the environment these days, it’s easy to forget about paper; another product the world produces and wastes far too much of. Of course, paper is readily and easily recycled in the UK these days, but recycling should be the last option in every household, as it uses energy which otherwise wouldn’t be required. In this article I hope to inspire you with ideas for paper reuse, and get you to think about every piece of paper or card that enters your house. If you’d like some ideas for reducing your paper waste, so you have less to reuse, this article should help.

So, how can I reuse paper or card?

There are so many options available to you before you fling your paper straight in to your recycling bin. Give one a go today!

Continue reading Paper: how to reuse it

Bradford: Healing wounds with recycled eggshells

Researchers based at Bradford Royal Infirmary are currently developing a wound dressing which utilises the thin, fibrous membrane found inside hen’s eggshells.

The researchers are from NIHR WoundTec HTC at the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), and are working in unison with a Norwegian company, Biovotecat, at the BRI site.

What are the benefits?

This groundbreaking research could be set to save the NHS millions of pounds, as wound management currently costs the NHS an eye-watering £5 billion per year. With 2.2 million wounds to tend per year, it is clear to see that the current cost of wound management is high. So, the eggshells cost less to buy than traditional wound dressings, but also the healing and anti-inflammatory properties of the eggshell membranes mean that wounds will heal faster and so treatment time will be significantly shorter too.

Continue reading Bradford: Healing wounds with recycled eggshells

10 reuse ideas for eggshells

Eggs are a popular food worldwide, but we only eat the inside part. So, that leaves the outer shell for us to deal with. In the past – or maybe even now, still – you’ll have just thrown it into the trash without a second thought. However, there are much better things you could be doing with them, which are far friendlier for the Earth than adding to our landfill. Take a look at our ideas below for some ‘eggspiration’!

Use in compost & organic gardening

Eggshells can be composted, so there’s no excuse to ever throw your discarded shells into the rubbish bin! They can also be used alone, crushed, in organic gardening as a slug and snail repellent. Whilst keeping pests at bay, the broken shell will also be adding nutrients to your soil, unlike nasty, unnatural chemical slug pellets.

Continue reading 10 reuse ideas for eggshells

25 ways to reuse an empty glass jar

You’ve got to the bottom of a pot of jam, marmalade, mayonnaise, or olives. Now what do you do with the jar? In our house we often reuse our glass jars for other food storage: wholesale nuts and seeds, the remains of a tin of baked beans, or some leftovers from dinner. However, what if you don’t need another glass jar? What if your kitchen cupboards are full? We’ve listed 25 ideas below of ways to utilise your empty jar. Which will you try?

  • Fill your glass jar with some fresh water and fill it with fresh flowers from your garden to create a lovely, free vase.
  • Make a batch of jam, marmalade, lemon curd or chutney and gift it in your jar. Jazz the jar up with a label and some pretty ribbon. Your recipient will love it!
Image credit: Pixabay
Image credit: Pixabay

Continue reading 25 ways to reuse an empty glass jar

Fast fashion & the destruction of developing countries

It’s a little known fact that us Brits wear just 70 per cent of the clothes that we have stored away in our wardrobes, which leaves us with a total of 1.7 billion unused items. On average, a consumer keeps their garments for three years, but even more shocking than this is the fact that something might be frequently worn in the first year, and then phased into the stockpile of unworn clothes later on. That is why the average British closet is so overstuffed: we don’t wear all of the clothes we own.

The spending habits of the average person in the West have changed dramatically over the last hundred or so years when it comes to buying clothing. Between 2002 and 2003, for example, people in the US spent, on average, four per cent of their income on clothes, whereas back between the years of 1934 and 1946, clothing used up 12 per cent of people’s incomes. The current average expenditure per item in the USA is $14.60. Don’t go thinking that we are all consuming less though. On average, just one person in the UK will produce 70 Kg of textiles waste per year – that is a lot of clothing. Cheap, fast fashion means we are spending less yet buying more.

So, what will happen after you clean out your closet? Continue reading Fast fashion & the destruction of developing countries

Are You Ready for National Zero Waste Week 2015?

What is National Zero Waste Week 2015?

zero-waste-week-logo-pledge

Zero Waste Week is a week in September which focuses on protecting the environment through sending no waste to landfill. The 2015 theme is ‘reuse’, which is great as it will help people realise that by reusing items, we are benefiting the environment and our purse/wallet.

This video explains National Zero Waste Week really well:

Ideas for your Zero Waste Week pledge

What will you pledge to do for NZWW 2015 – at home, or at work with your colleagues?

If you’re an individual, you could try:

  • Preparing all your lunches at home for the week (not buying packaged lunches)
  • Commiting to using only reusable carrier bags – no plastic bags
  • Repurposing all glass items you use in that week
  • Repurposing all tin cans you use in that week
  • Using a refillable cup for coffee shop drinks
  • Using a washable alternative to facial wipes or cotton wool for make-up removal, such as a flannel or reusable eco cotton pads
  • Using reusable and washable cloths for cleaning rather than paper towels or other ‘disposables’
Image of a disposable coffee cup and macaroon box
Image credit: Pixabay

At work, you could try:

  • Preparing your lunches at home
  • Using a refillable cup each for coffee shop drinks
  • Reusing any paper that is printed out: utilise both sides instead of just one
  • After shredding confidential documents, reuse the shredded paper – it can be used for packing items up, or as cat litter or animal bedding
  • Reuse all jiffy bags and boxes you receive deliveries in
  • Setting up a compost bin for fruit peel, coffee grounds, tea bags, etc., which staff members can then take home for their garden
  • Switching to a fabric hand towel instead of paper towels
Image of shredded paper
Image credit: Pixabay

What do Forge Waste & Recycling already do to reduce waste to landfill?

We are committed to helping the environment, and as a company who collect around 200 tonnes of waste per week, we don’t send any to landfill. Anything that can be recycled, is, and any leftover waste is turned into Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF), which is then used to create electricity.

Even our plastic waste collection bins are recycled; when they are no longer fit for use, we remove the wheels and the plastic is shredded and granulated to produce other high quality items.

Of course, in an ideal world there would be nothing to recycle, but in 2015 there is still a lot of work to be done on this issue. This dedicated week is a great help though, so why not get involved?

What will Forge Waste & Recycling be pledging for Zero Waste Week 2015?

When we gave this some thought, we realised everyone in our office has been drinking bottled water to keep hydrated in the hot weather. Whilst we, of course, recycle these bottles, we know we need to eliminate them completely. So we pledge to reuse all of the plastic bottles we currently have for as long as possible, and not buy any more – ever!

plastic-water-bottles
Image credit: Pixabay

Where can I find out more?

If you’d like to know more about Zero Waste Week, the official website is here. The couple who run it have their own brilliant website too, which can be found here – take a look for year-round hints and tips on living waste free. Small changes can make a big difference if we all work together. Let’s be Zero heroes! What will you pledge this September?

Featured image credit: Pixabay

10 Recycled Gift Wrap Ideas

Not only is gift wrapping expensive, but it is prone to being a wasteful activity; brand new wrapping paper which is wrapped around a present, only to be ripped off and either binned or sent back to be recycled. Some local authorities don’t even accept wrapping paper or greetings cards in their recycling bins any more due to several reasons: attached glitter, sticky tape, ribbons, and tags, or the wrapping paper being coated in foil or plastic.

So, here are 10 suggestions for wrapping gifts which are not only good for the environment, but are also really unique, personalised and show the recipient you put in lots of thought and effort.

Paper Replacements:

1.      Newspaper or magazines

Any newspaper or magazine would work, but if you can find a page which has the recipient’s date of birth on it or pictures of their favourite film star, for example, you’re really on to a winner. Have a good root around in your recycling bin and see what you can find.

Image credit: Pixabay
Image credit: Pixabay

2.      Calendar page

Try wrapping your gift in a large calendar sheet, with the recipient’s special day circled. You are guaranteed to raise a big grin, and it will certainly be the best wrapping paper they receive this year!

3.      Fabric

This could be any fabric, but why not recycle an old scarf, handkerchief, pillowcase or tea towel you no longer use. Alternatively, you might have some scraps of fabric lying around if you’re a crafter, or some old clothes you don’t want which can be cut up into squares for fun wrapping material.

Image credit: Pixabay
Image credit: Pixabay

4.      Map

Do you have some old maps lying around? Why not wrap a gift with them! The result looks really lovely. If you can locate a map that is specific to that person, even better. Examples could be their place of birth, where they got married, or where they went on their honeymoon.

Image credit: Pixabay
Image credit: Pixabay

5.      Shopping bags

A shop-bought or handmade reusable ‘bag for life’ could be great for housing a gift. It is essentially an extra gift – a useful one at that – and can help a friend or family member with their own recycling efforts. There are many pretty bags available, or a handmade one could be personalised for your lucky recipient.

6.      Children’s drawings

All those pictures your child creates at school and home are wonderful, but there are sadly only so many you can display at once. What could be more wonderful than a Grandmother receiving a present wrapped in her Grandchild’s art work? I guarantee, they will LOVE IT!

Child's art as upcycled gift wrap
Image credit: Pixabay

Embellishments and extras:

7.      Toilet roll tubes

Simple, but fun. Use a toilet roll tube to wrap a small gift, and present it like a cracker, using one of the above suggestions to cover it and create the cracker shape.

8.      Leaves

For most of the year, leaves are widely available beneath trees and bushes. The good news is, they can look great on a wrapped present instead of a shop-bought bow. You could even decorate them with pens, paint, or glitter.

9.      Handmade bows or flowers

Bows can be made from any scraps of paper you have: magazines, leaflets, newspaper. You can make several different types – from really simple to rather complicated. You’ll find tutorials on how to make them online.

Image credit: Pixabay
Image credit: Pixabay

10.      Pom poms

If you have a length of wool, you could make a little pom pom to decorate a gift. All you need is the wool or twine, a fork and a pair of scissors. The below tutorial will show you how it’s done.

Featured image credit: Pixabay